Prof. Hideki Kambara
Prof. Jun Yu
Prof. Ulf Landegren

Name:

Hideki Kambara

Title:

Honorary Fellow of Hitachi Ltd., President of frontierbiosystems.com

Affiliation:

Frontierbiosystems.Inc, Japan

Email:

hi4512kam@yahoo.co.jp

100-word biography:

He was engaged in developing new ionization technologies (LC/MS, matrix assisted SIMS, etc.) for mass spectrometry of bioorganic compounds from 1977 to 1985.

He started to develop fluorescent DNA sequencers at 1982. Since then he has been engaged in developing technologies for DNA analysis. He developed capillary array DNA sequencers which were commercialized to contribute greatly to the completion of the human genome project. He started to develop technologies for single cell analysis at 2005. Now he is much interested in developing tools for site specific tissue analysis at single cell resolution.

Title:

The development of DNA related technologies

Abstract:

The development of DNA analysis tools can be divided into 5 stages. The 1st stage; from autoradiography to automated DNA sequencers. The 2nd stage; high throughput DNA sequencers for the Huma Genome Project. The 3rd stage; DNA analysis for medical applications. The4th stage; ensemble approach to single object approach (single-cell analysis). The 5th stage; site-specific tissue analysis. The site-specific tissue analysis is getting more and more important to understand tissue functions. We have developed a micro-biopsy system for the tissue analysis. It has a spinning narrow hollow punching needle to obtain micro-dissections having diameters of 0.05-0.2mm from any types of tissue samples.

Other:


Name:

Jun Yu

Title:

Professor

Affiliation:

University of Chinese Academy of Sciences   (UCAS).

Email:

junyu@big.ac.cn

100-word   biography:

Jun YU is an   endowed professor of University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS). He   obtained his BS degree from Department of Chemistry, Jilin University in 1983   and PhD degree in Biomedical Sciences from New York University School of   Medicine in 1990. He joined the University of Washington Human Genome Center   in 1993 after a scholarship-supported postdoctoral research as Research   Assistant Professor of NYU. He established both the Human Genome Center at   the Institute of Genetics in 1998 and Beijing Institute of Genomics in 2003   at CAS. After having served his directorship for the two institutions in two   terms, he has focused his research interests to scientific instrumentation.   He has published over 350 peer-reviewed papers and supervised over 100   graduate students. He has won numerous scientific awards, including TWAS   Prize in Agricultural Sciences for 2012; Outstanding Science and Technology   Achievements (2003), CAS; “Qiushi” Annual Award for Scientific Achievement   (2002); Young Investigator Award for Oversea Collaboration, the Natural   Science Foundation of P. R. China (1999); American Foundation for Urological   Diseases Ph.D. Research Scholar (1991); China-US Biology Examination and   Application (CUSBEA) Scholarship for Ph.D. Candidate (1983).

Title:

Genomics and Human Life: Challenges from   Technology and Intelligence

Abstract:

Abstract: 20 years after 20 the first   human genome was sequenced, initiatives to sequence every person’s genome   have been launched in many nations, attributable largely to technology   advancements in DNA sequencing and data analysis. New challenges also become   obvious where directly sequencing RNA including its covalently-modified   nucleotides and AI-directed structure prediction is one of them. Another key   challenge involved engagement of people who are enrolled in the Digital Personal   Genome for healthcare purposes and health management over life-span. Meeting   these two challenges with distinct goals is what we think hard and must do in   well the next decade or two.



Name:

Ulf   Landegren

Title:

Professor

Affiliation:

Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, sweden

Email:

ulf.landegren@igp.uu.se

100-word   biography:

Ulf Landegren received his MD and PhD in Uppsala, Sweden, before spending five years at California Institute of Technology. As professor of molecular medicine in Uppsala his research focuses on developing molecular tools with a potential to meet important medical needs first focused on analyzing genetic variation with techniques such as oligonucleotide ligation assays and padlock probes. In later work his lab showed that pairs of oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies can allow high- throughput, high-performance analysis of protein expression levels in liquid samples and for imaging their distribution in situ using a family of proximity ligation assays.

Professor Landegren is a member of EMBO, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, the European Academies’ Scientific Advisory Committee (EASAC), and the Royal Society of Sciences at Uppsala. He is member of several academic or industrial boards and advisory boards. He has authored 224 peer-reviewed publications, and he   is inventor of 46 patents or applications. Work in his lab has so far given rise to 12 spin-out companies with a combined staff of more than 400 people, including two companies that are now publicly traded (Olink Proteomics and Q-linea). Technologies from his lab have been licensed to many leading international biotech and diagnostic companies.

Title:

Molecular   tools for biomarker analysis

Abstract:

Efficient tools for biomarker analysis are needed to diagnose diseases and identify how best to treat these. My talk will deal with three approaches to examine different classes of biomarkers, building on common strategic molecular elements. A fundamental assumption in our work is that stringent analysis will require highly specific assay techniques, and that troubling cross reactivity can be minimized in assays that depend on   multiple target recognition events.

In a first segment I will describe the technology behind the multiplex proximity extension assays for protein measurements in liquid samples. I will give a few examples from our own work how the assays may be applied in an increasing range of situations.

Next, I will describe the analogous need for panels of high-performance in situ assays to image proteins and their patterns of interactions and modifications that reflect activity states. I will describe work in my lab using in situ proximity ligation assays to better characterize tumor cells and tissues and their drug responses.

Finally, tumor-specific mutations represent highly specific   markers of those malignancies, and sufficiently specific and selective assays can assist in monitoring the progress of disease and of therapy. I will describe a novel technique – SafeLock probes - for detecting exceedingly rare point mutations from as little as one malignant cell in 100 000 nucleated blood or bone marrow cells. The assay has been adapted to conform to routine clinical workflow for therapy follow-up in acute myeloid leukemia.

Disclaimer. UL is founder and shareholder of Olink, Navinci and Rarity, commercializing techniques from his laboratory.

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